Field Training Officer: Basic

Field Training Officer: Basic

Presented by: Kevin Kelleher, Field Training Solutions

Wednesday - Friday, December 7 - 9, 2020, 8:30AM - 4:30PM.   $295

28 hours (POST Board Approved)

To register, contact dianne@ftosolutions.com.

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Our San Jose-based field training officer course prepares newly appointed FTOs for the important and challenging role they have in shaping the future of today’s modern law-enforcement agencies.

This course develops FTOs to be the best trainers possible. It focuses on how to teach, how to coach, how to address training problems, and how to evaluate performance. Upon completion of the three-day classroom portion of this course, participants will return to their agencies for an orientation to the field-training program used by their agency. Your FTO coordinator, using our guide, will instruct the participants in the format, forms, timeline, capabilities and limitations of your particular program.

No matter what field-training program your agency uses, this course will meet your FTO-developmental needs

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

  •  Field training philosophy
  •  The role of the field-training officer
  • Communication skills
  • DISC personality profile
  • Adult learning
  • Learning preferences
  • Generational differences
  • How to create training opportunities 
  • Performance documentation
  • Performance appraisal
  • Evaluation exercises

DAY ONE focuses on how to teach, including the Department of Justice FTO program recommendations such as learning preferences, generational differences, and the importance of personality in reading and communication.

Day One Agenda

  • Introduction and course overview
  • FTO program overview — Phase training, DOR, Program issues
  • Role of the FTO
  • Organizational skill set assessment
  • Adult learning
  • Problem- and scenario-based learning
  • Learning preferences

DAY TWO focuses on coaching and communication, including role plays confronting performance issues and performance improvement, and the impact of personality on communication and evaluation.

Day Two Agenda

  • Review of Day One
  • Performance scenario #1
  • Coaching
  • Performance Improvement Plan (PIP)
  • Performance scenario #2 — PIP writing and presentation
  • DISC Personality Inventory
  • Performance scenario #3 — PIP writing and presentation

DAY THREE focuses on evaluation, which includes evaluation exercises in which attendees are welcome to use their own DOR or our San Jose-based template.

Day Three Agenda

  • Review of Day Two
  • Evaluation overview
  • Categories and behavioral anchor
  • DOR / Narrative — Fahd Case
  • Evaluation exercises
  • Out of class assignments and course evaluations

Upon completion, each attendee will return to his or her agency for an orientation to the particular field training program that his or her agency uses.

 

INSTRUCTOR PROFILE:

Kevin Kelleher served many assignments with the Chisholm (MN), Bloomington (MN), and Wayzata (MN) Police Departments, including patrol, SWAT, investigations, sergeant, K9 supervisor, and oversaw field-training programs for over ten years before retiring as chief of police. He is an alumnus of the Southern Police Institute’s Administrative Officers Course and the Senior Management Institute for Police. Kevin holds a Master’s Degree in Education and teaches at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota, in Minneapolis, and is an instructor and course director for Northwestern University’s Center for Public Safety in Evanston, Illinois.

 

Managing Field Training

Managing Field Training

Presented by: Kevin Kelleher, Field Training Solutions

Monday, December 4, 2020, 8:30AM - 4:30PM.   $95

7 hours (POST Board Approved)

To register, contact dianne@ftosolutions.com.

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Our one-day Managing Field Training course is intended for those who oversee field training in their agency. The day will consist of discussion, presentation, practical exercises, and a round-table sharing of field training issues facing the attendees.

COURSE CONTENT:

  • Compare different types of field training programs. No matter what your program looks like now, its roots are probably in one of three programs. In this block we will explore the roots of those programs and compare and contrast how they work.
  • Identify training skills and methods used by successful FTOs. Have we created field training officers or field evaluation officers? This topic will identify the training and teaching skills that every FTO needs to have in his or her training tool kit.
  • Explore selection criteria for FTOs. Good FTOs have to have good police skill sets. What else should we be looking at in our FTOs?
  • Examine national standards for field training programs. This block will take a look at what the National Association of Field Training Officers (NAFTO) recommends in field training. We will also examine field-training practices the Department of Justice took issue with in consent decrees from around the country.
  • Identify factors and solutions in conflicts between FTOs and recruits. We’ve all heard about “personality problem” in the car. What causes it, and more important, what can we do about it?
  • Practice keeping your field training program current through modification and expansion of both the DOR and Training Inventory. We will practice program modification by developing a very basic field training program for newly promoted supervisors.

INSTRUCTOR PROFILE:

Kevin Kelleher served many assignments with the Chisholm (MN), Bloomington (MN), and Wayzata (MN) Police Departments, including patrol, SWAT, investigations, sergeant, K9 supervisor, and oversaw field-training programs for over ten years before retiring as chief of police. He is an alumnus of the Southern Police Institute’s Administrative Officers Course and the Senior Management Institute for Police. Kevin holds a Master’s Degree in Education and teaches at St. Mary’s University of Minnesota, in Minneapolis, and is an instructor and course director for Northwestern University’s Center for Public Safety in Evanston, Illinois.

 

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Presented by: Rich Boyington, REID & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL

BASIC COURSE

Tuesday - Thursday, November 3 - 5, 2020, 8 AM - 4:30 PM

Tuition: $445

MN POST training hours: 24

ADVANCED COURSE*

Friday, November 6, 2020, 8 AM - 3 PM

Tuition: $130

MN POST training hours: 8

* Participants who have previously attended the three-day basic course are eligible to attend the advanced session only. 

To register, click here.

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Objectives for the basic course are 1) to provide the fundamentals necessary to conduct a proper interview and interrogation, 2) to provide a structured frame of reference for those interviewers who have some experience but also may not have had any formal training in the area and 3) to improve the efficiency of all participants in obtraining the truth from suspects, witnesses and victims in a legally acceptable manner.

Objectives for the advanced course are 1) to provide additional tactics and techniques designed to obtain confessions from the deceptive suspect in more expedient manner, 2) to provide finesse tactics dealing with the psychology of interrogation to enhance the investigators ability to acquire confessions that might not have otherwise been obtained and 3) to provide a logical guideline that may be used to profile out any type of suspect for interrogation.

More than 300,000 professionals in the law enforcement and security fields have attended these programs since it they were first offered in 1974. Participants come from both the private sector (retailing, finance, health care, manufacturing, etc.) and the public sector, including all levels of law enforcement and government; from every U.S. State and Canadian Province, as well as countries in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES:


Distinguishing between interview and interrogation
Legal aspects of interview and interrogation
What makes an excellent interviewer
Factors affecting a subject’s behavior
Behavior symptom analysis (see detail below)
Five points to follow when evaluating behavior
Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
Baiting techniques

The REID Nine Steps of Interrogation (see detail below)
1. Behavior symptoms analysis
2. Evaluating Attitudes
3. Evaluating Non-verbal Behavior
4. Evaluating Verbal Behavior
5. Evaluating Paralinguistic Behavior
6. Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
7. The Baiting Technique
8. Analyzing Factual Information Prior to the Interview
9. Asking Behavior Provoking Questions

THE REID NINE STEPS OF INTERROGATION
1. The Positive Confrontation
2. Theme Development
3. Handling Denials
4. Overcoming Objections
5. Procuring and Retaining the Suspect's Attention
6. Handling the Suspect's Passive Mood
7. Presenting an Alternative Question
8. Detailing the Offense
9. Elements of Oral and Written Statements

ADVANCED TOPICS INCLUDE ABOVE TOPICS AS THEY RELATE TO:

Advanced concepts in behavior symptom analysis, behavioral interview and REID approach to interrogation:
Difficult suspects that give the interrogator problems and specific tactics to get them to confess
Defiant, neutral and accepting suspects - how to move suspects out of a stage for best end results
Distinguishing elements which identify need, lifestyle, impulse and esteem criminal characteristics
Additional interrogation tactics.

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Presented by: Rich Boyington, REID & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL

BASIC COURSE

Tuesday - Thursday, March 10 - 12, 2020, 8 AM - 4:30 PM

Tuition: $445

MN POST training hours: 24

ADVANCED COURSE*

Friday, March  13, 2020, 8 AM - 3 PM

Tuition: $130

MN POST training hours: 8

* Participants who have previously attended the three-day basic course are eligible to attend the advanced session only. 

To register, click here.

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Objectives for the basic course are 1) to provide the fundamentals necessary to conduct a proper interview and interrogation, 2) to provide a structured frame of reference for those interviewers who have some experience but also may not have had any formal training in the area and 3) to improve the efficiency of all participants in obtraining the truth from suspects, witnesses and victims in a legally acceptable manner.

Objectives for the advanced course are 1) to provide additional tactics and techniques designed to obtain confessions from the deceptive suspect in more expedient manner, 2) to provide finesse tactics dealing with the psychology of interrogation to enhance the investigators ability to acquire confessions that might not have otherwise been obtained and 3) to provide a logical guideline that may be used to profile out any type of suspect for interrogation.

More than 300,000 professionals in the law enforcement and security fields have attended these programs since it they were first offered in 1974. Participants come from both the private sector (retailing, finance, health care, manufacturing, etc.) and the public sector, including all levels of law enforcement and government; from every U.S. State and Canadian Province, as well as countries in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES:


Distinguishing between interview and interrogation
Legal aspects of interview and interrogation
What makes an excellent interviewer
Factors affecting a subject’s behavior
Behavior symptom analysis (see detail below)
Five points to follow when evaluating behavior
Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
Baiting techniques

The REID Nine Steps of Interrogation (see detail below)
1. Behavior symptoms analysis
2. Evaluating Attitudes
3. Evaluating Non-verbal Behavior
4. Evaluating Verbal Behavior
5. Evaluating Paralinguistic Behavior
6. Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
7. The Baiting Technique
8. Analyzing Factual Information Prior to the Interview
9. Asking Behavior Provoking Questions

THE REID NINE STEPS OF INTERROGATION
1. The Positive Confrontation
2. Theme Development
3. Handling Denials
4. Overcoming Objections
5. Procuring and Retaining the Suspect's Attention
6. Handling the Suspect's Passive Mood
7. Presenting an Alternative Question
8. Detailing the Offense
9. Elements of Oral and Written Statements

ADVANCED TOPICS INCLUDE ABOVE TOPICS AS THEY RELATE TO:

Advanced concepts in behavior symptom analysis, behavioral interview and REID approach to interrogation:
Difficult suspects that give the interrogator problems and specific tactics to get them to confess
Defiant, neutral and accepting suspects - how to move suspects out of a stage for best end results
Distinguishing elements which identify need, lifestyle, impulse and esteem criminal characteristics
Additional interrogation tactics.

To view the course brochure, click here.

To view a printable flyer for this class, click here.

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Presented by: William P. Schreiber, REID & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL

BASIC COURSE

Tuesday - Thursday, November 5 - 7, 2019, 8 AM - 4:30 PM

Tuition: $445

MN POST training hours: 24

ADVANCED COURSE*

Friday, November 8, 2019, 8 AM - 3 PM

Tuition: $130

MN POST training hours: 8

* Participants who have previously attended the three-day basic course are eligible to attend the advanced session only. 

To register, click here.

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Objectives for the basic course are 1) to provide the fundamentals necessary to conduct a proper interview and interrogation, 2) to provide a structured frame of reference for those interviewers who have some experience but also may not have had any formal training in the area and 3) to improve the efficiency of all participants in obtraining the truth from suspects, witnesses and victims in a legally acceptable manner.

Objectives for the advanced course are 1) to provide additional tactics and techniques designed to obtain confessions from the deceptive suspect in more expedient manner, 2) to provide finesse tactics dealing with the psychology of interrogation to enhance the investigators ability to acquire confessions that might not have otherwise been obtained and 3) to provide a logical guideline that may be used to profile out any type of suspect for interrogation.

More than 300,000 professionals in the law enforcement and security fields have attended these programs since it they were first offered in 1974. Participants come from both the private sector (retailing, finance, health care, manufacturing, etc.) and the public sector, including all levels of law enforcement and government; from every U.S. State and Canadian Province, as well as countries in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES:


Distinguishing between interview and interrogation
Legal aspects of interview and interrogation
What makes an excellent interviewer
Factors affecting a subject’s behavior
Behavior symptom analysis (see detail below)
Five points to follow when evaluating behavior
Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
Baiting techniques

The REID Nine Steps of Interrogation (see detail below)
1. Behavior symptoms analysis
2. Evaluating Attitudes
3. Evaluating Non-verbal Behavior
4. Evaluating Verbal Behavior
5. Evaluating Paralinguistic Behavior
6. Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
7. The Baiting Technique
8. Analyzing Factual Information Prior to the Interview
9. Asking Behavior Provoking Questions

THE REID NINE STEPS OF INTERROGATION
1. The Positive Confrontation
2. Theme Development
3. Handling Denials
4. Overcoming Objections
5. Procuring and Retaining the Suspect's Attention
6. Handling the Suspect's Passive Mood
7. Presenting an Alternative Question
8. Detailing the Offense
9. Elements of Oral and Written Statements

ADVANCED TOPICS INCLUDE ABOVE TOPICS AS THEY RELATE TO:

Advanced concepts in behavior symptom analysis, behavioral interview and REID approach to interrogation:
Difficult suspects that give the interrogator problems and specific tactics to get them to confess
Defiant, neutral and accepting suspects - how to move suspects out of a stage for best end results
Distinguishing elements which identify need, lifestyle, impulse and esteem criminal characteristics
Additional interrogation tactics.

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Presented by: William P. Schreiber, REID & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL

BASIC COURSE

Tuesday - Thursday, March 19 - 21, 2019, 8 AM - 4:30 PM

Tuition: $445

MN POST training hours: 24

ADVANCED COURSE*

Friday, March 22, 2019, 8 AM - 3 PM

Tuition: $130

MN POST training hours: 8

* Participants who have previously attended the three-day basic course are eligible to attend the advanced session only. 

To register, click here.

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Objectives for the basic course are 1) to provide the fundamentals necessary to conduct a proper interview and interrogation, 2) to provide a structured frame of reference for those interviewers who have some experience but also may not have had any formal training in the area and 3) to improve the efficiency of all participants in obtraining the truth from suspects, witnesses and victims in a legally acceptable manner.

Objectives for the advanced course are 1) to provide additional tactics and techniques designed to obtain confessions from the deceptive suspect in more expedient manner, 2) to provide finesse tactics dealing with the psychology of interrogation to enhance the investigators ability to acquire confessions that might not have otherwise been obtained and 3) to provide a logical guideline that may be used to profile out any type of suspect for interrogation.

More than 300,000 professionals in the law enforcement and security fields have attended these programs since it they were first offered in 1974. Participants come from both the private sector (retailing, finance, health care, manufacturing, etc.) and the public sector, including all levels of law enforcement and government; from every U.S. State and Canadian Province, as well as countries in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES:


Distinguishing between interview and interrogation
Legal aspects of interview and interrogation
What makes an excellent interviewer
Factors affecting a subject’s behavior
Behavior symptom analysis (see detail below)
Five points to follow when evaluating behavior
Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
Baiting techniques

The REID Nine Steps of Interrogation (see detail below)
1. Behavior symptoms analysis
2. Evaluating Attitudes
3. Evaluating Non-verbal Behavior
4. Evaluating Verbal Behavior
5. Evaluating Paralinguistic Behavior
6. Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
7. The Baiting Technique
8. Analyzing Factual Information Prior to the Interview
9. Asking Behavior Provoking Questions

THE REID NINE STEPS OF INTERROGATION
1. The Positive Confrontation
2. Theme Development
3. Handling Denials
4. Overcoming Objections
5. Procuring and Retaining the Suspect's Attention
6. Handling the Suspect's Passive Mood
7. Presenting an Alternative Question
8. Detailing the Offense
9. Elements of Oral and Written Statements

ADVANCED TOPICS INCLUDE ABOVE TOPICS AS THEY RELATE TO:

Advanced concepts in behavior symptom analysis, behavioral interview and REID approach to interrogation:
Difficult suspects that give the interrogator problems and specific tactics to get them to confess
Defiant, neutral and accepting suspects - how to move suspects out of a stage for best end results
Distinguishing elements which identify need, lifestyle, impulse and esteem criminal characteristics
Additional interrogation tactics.

Crisis/ Hostage Negotiation: Level 1 (Basic)

Crisis/ Hostage Negotiation: Level 1 (Basic)

Presented by: Crisis Systems Management, LLC

Hosted by: Airport Police Department

November 26 - 30, 2018, 8AM - 5PM.   $495

To register, click here.

 

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Crisis/Hostage Negotiation – Level I (Basic) addresses the fundamental tasks of a successful crisis negotiator. This course will prepare you to work as part of a coordinated negotiation team and handle a variety of crisis situations including hostage takers, barricaded subjects, and potential suicide victims.

 

The effective application of active listening skills and the Behavioral Influence Stairway Model will be discussed at length and Re-emphasized throughout the progression of all three courses. You will learn the different phases of the negotiation process, from the introduction to the surrender, and specific strategies and techniques to be used along the way. We will discuss when negotiation may not be the best solution, what items are negotiable and non-negotiable, and what to do in non-response situations.

 

The management of intelligence and information is a critical aspect of mitigating any law enforcement threat and you will learn specific techniques for managing the flow of information during a crisis.

 

You will also gain a basic understanding of the psychological motivations of persons in crisis and learn to recognize the characteristics of emotionally disturbed persons. You will learn about the personality disorders which are most commonly encountered during a crisis incident as well as strategies for affecting a positive outcome Challenging, team-oriented, scenario-driven practical exercises are an integral part of the course and will allow you the opportunity to practice and refine your crisis negotiation skills.

 

This course is open to all members of law enforcement and corrections, dispatchers, mental health professionals supporting law enforcement operations, and chaplains supporting law enforcement operations.

 

Regarding Registration:

Contact Bobby Schembre at (573) 864-5031 or email bobby@crisisnegotiation.us

 

Regarding Curriculum:
Contact Deb McMahon at (417) 594-1499 or email crisisnegotiation@gmail.com

 

Regarding Training Site:
Contact Tanis Ford at (612) 467-0707 or email Tanis.Ford@mspmac.org

 

To view the course flyer PDF, click here:  Minneapolis Level I Flyer 112618

For discounted lodging, click here.

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Presented by: William P. Schreiber, REID & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL

BASIC COURSE

Tuesday - Thursday, November 6 - 8, 2018, 8 AM - 4:30 PM

Tuition: $445

MN POST training hours: 24

ADVANCED COURSE*

Friday, November 9, 2018, 8 AM - 3 PM

Tuition: $130

MN POST training hours: 8

* Participants who have previously attended the three-day basic course are eligible to attend the advanced session only. 

To register, click here. 

 

COURSE OVERALL LEARNING GOAL:

Objectives for the basic course are 1) to provide the fundamentals necessary to conduct a proper interview and interrogation, 2) to provide a structured frame of reference for those interviewers who have some experience but also may not have had any formal training in the area and 3) to improve the efficiency of all participants in obtraining the truth from suspects, witnesses and victims in a legally acceptable manner.

Objectives for the advanced course are 1) to provide additional tactics and techniques designed to obtain confessions from the deceptive suspect in more expedient manner, 2) to provide finesse tactics dealing with the psychology of interrogation to enhance the investigators ability to acquire confessions that might not have otherwise been obtained and 3) to provide a logical guideline that may be used to profile out any type of suspect for interrogation.

More than 300,000 professionals in the law enforcement and security fields have attended these programs since it they were first offered in 1974. Participants come from both the private sector (retailing, finance, health care, manufacturing, etc.) and the public sector, including all levels of law enforcement and government; from every U.S. State and Canadian Province, as well as countries in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

SPECIFIC PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES:

Distinguishing between interview and interrogation
Legal aspects of interview and interrogation
What makes an excellent interviewer
Factors affecting a subject’s behavior
Behavior symptom analysis (see detail below)
Five points to follow when evaluating behavior
Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
Baiting techniques

The REID Nine Steps of Interrogation (see detail below)
1. Behavior symptoms analysis
2. Evaluating Attitudes
3. Evaluating Non-verbal Behavior
4. Evaluating Verbal Behavior
5. Evaluating Paralinguistic Behavior
6. Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
7. The Baiting Technique
8. Analyzing Factual Information Prior to the Interview
9. Asking Behavior Provoking Questions

THE REID NINE STEPS OF INTERROGATION
1. The Positive Confrontation
2. Theme Development
3. Handling Denials
4. Overcoming Objections
5. Procuring and Retaining the Suspect's Attention
6. Handling the Suspect's Passive Mood
7. Presenting an Alternative Question
8. Detailing the Offense
9. Elements of Oral and Written Statements

ADVANCED TOPICS INCLUDE ABOVE TOPICS AS THEY RELATE TO:

Advanced concepts in behavior symptom analysis, behavioral interview and REID approach to interrogation:
Difficult suspects that give the interrogator problems and specific tactics to get them to confess
Defiant, neutral and accepting suspects - how to move suspects out of a stage for best end results
Distinguishing elements which identify need, lifestyle, impulse and esteem criminal characteristics
Additional interrogation tactics.

 

To view the course flyer, click here: MN Edina TB 110618

Interview & Interrogation: Basic & Advanced

Presented by: William P. Schreiber, REID & Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL

BASIC COURSE

Tuesday - Thursday, March 20 - 22, 2018, 8 AM - 4:30 PM

Tuition: $445

MN POST training hours: 24

ADVANCED COURSE*

Friday, March 23, 2018, 8 AM - 3 PM

Tuition: $130

MN POST training hours: 8

* Participants who have previously attended the three-day basic course are eligible to attend the advanced session only. 

To register, click here. 

COURSE SUMMARY:

Objectives for the basic course are 1) to provide the fundamentals necessary to conduct a proper interview and interrogation, 2) to provide a structured frame of reference for those interviewers who have some experience but also may not have had any formal training in the area and 3) to improve the efficiency of all participants in obtraining the truth from suspects, witnesses and victims in a legally acceptable manner.

Objectives for the advanced course are 1) to provide additional tactics and techniques designed to obtain confessions from the deceptive suspect in more expedient manner, 2) to provide finesse tactics dealing with the psychology of interrogation to enhance the investigators ability to acquire confessions that might not have otherwise been obtained and 3) to provide a logical guideline that may be used to profile out any type of suspect for interrogation.

More than 300,000 professionals in the law enforcement and security fields have attended these programs since it they were first offered in 1974. Participants come from both the private sector (retailing, finance, health care, manufacturing, etc.) and the public sector, including all levels of law enforcement and government; from every U.S. State and Canadian Province, as well as countries in Europe, Asia and the Middle East.

COURSE CONTENT

BASIC TOPICS INCLUDE:
Distinguishing between interview and interrogation
Legal aspects of interview and interrogation
What makes an excellent interviewer
Factors affecting a subject’s behavior
Behavior symptom analysis (see detail below)
Five points to follow when evaluating behavior
Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
Baiting techniques

The REID Nine Steps of Interrogation (see detail below)
1. Behavior symptoms analysis
2. Evaluating Attitudes
3. Evaluating Non-verbal Behavior
4. Evaluating Verbal Behavior
5. Evaluating Paralinguistic Behavior
6. Reid Behavioral Analysis Interview™
7. The Baiting Technique
8. Analyzing Factual Information Prior to the Interview
9. Asking Behavior Provoking Questions

THE REID NINE STEPS OF INTERROGATION
1. The Positive Confrontation
2. Theme Development
3. Handling Denials
4. Overcoming Objections
5. Procuring and Retaining the Suspect's Attention
6. Handling the Suspect's Passive Mood
7. Presenting an Alternative Question
8. Detailing the Offense
9. Elements of Oral and Written Statements

ADVANCED TOPICS INCLUDE ABOVE TOPICS AS THEY RELATE TO:

Advanced concepts in behavior symptom analysis, behavioral interview and REID approach to interrogation:
Difficult suspects that give the interrogator problems and specific tactics to get them to confess
Defiant, neutral and accepting suspects - how to move suspects out of a stage for best end results
Distinguishing elements which identify need, lifestyle, impulse and esteem criminal characteristics
Additional interrogation tactics.